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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Oct 7, 2010 9:14am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: One for the Troll

All right thinking people love Spongebob, Charlie.

Good to see you! You look kind of like you could be my neighbour's younger brother (supposing he had a younger brother, and maybe he does, I just don't know...)

This post was modified by robthewordsmith on 2010-10-07 16:14:08

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Poster: CharlieMiller Date: Oct 7, 2010 9:16am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: One for the Troll

Maybe I am your neighbor.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Oct 7, 2010 9:21am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: One for the Troll

Come round for coffee. Bring some tapes.

:-)

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 7, 2010 10:18pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: One for the Troll

Nice pix, Charlie. And yet ... no Squidward in sight!

Sigh. It's just like people thinking the band was all about Jerry. Sponge Bob is great, and yet, what would he be without Patrick and Squidward? Will it take the demise of The Square One before the others get the respect they deserve?

P.S.: Thanks for all the great work. In the future, I will attempt to play them backwards for hidden messages from Bikini Bottom ... :-)

This post was modified by AltheaRose on 2010-10-08 05:18:56

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Poster: high flow Date: Oct 7, 2010 10:23pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: One for the Troll

My kids are 8 and 4.....we're in the Sponge Bob wheelhouse years. I like Mr Crabs. ar-ar-ar-ar-ar.....

The pic above reminds me......we were driving through a neighboring town and saw what I thought was a Klansman. Then I thought, no f*cking way......but as we drew closer, it seemed there was no other possible explanation for the outfit being worn by this person bopping along the side of the road. As we passed, I looked back and it was a slice-of-pizza costume. All white in back and a tempting deluxe combo up-front. The wife and I laughed our arses right off. The kids didn't get it and we intend to keep it that way.

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 7, 2010 11:27pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: One for the Troll

Here's a brief version of my Klan story: Ages ago, I was doing an in-depth article on the Klan for a newspaper. (I hung out with them and all for the story. Kinda scary, very fascinating.) But the funny part was my photographer. He spent much of a Klan rally hanging out by the port-a-potties waiting for the prizewinning shot of a Klansman coming out of the john, and hence missed the true great shot: the Klansman falling off the hay wagon. Right on his bedsheet-covered behind.




This post was modified by AltheaRose on 2010-10-08 06:27:30

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Poster: TOOTMO Date: Oct 7, 2010 9:33am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: One for the Troll

Hmmm... You seemed taller in your emails. And, I always thought you were Asian and Charles Miller was just your attempt at anglicization. And, that you had a lisp. Oh well, guess I was off.
(Don't feel bad: you should see what I imagine Wm. Tell to look like!!) heh, heh, heh.

TOOTMO

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Poster: Jobygoob Date: Oct 7, 2010 11:26am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: One for the Troll

Charles P. Miller (c. 1851-November 7, 1881) was an American gambler, confidence man and swindler. He was popularly known as "King of the Banco Men", at times sharing that title with fellow tricksters Tom O'Brien and Joseph "Hungry Joe" Lewis, and ran one of the largest banco operations in the United States during the late 19th century.[1][2][3]

Contents [hide]
1 Biography
1.1 Early life and criminal career
1.2 Death
2 References
3 Further reading

Biography

Early life and criminal career

Charles Miller was born to a county officer in Texas around 1851. Growing up during Reconstruction, he was said to be an unruly child due to "parental indulgence". By age 15, he had begun drinking heavily and had reportedly "fallen into bad company with both sexes". He was eventually disowned by his father and began "riding the rails" until arriving in New Orleans, Louisiana. Miller began working as a "capper" for Major S.A. Doran at his Royal Street gambling house and while there began learning confidence tricks and banco steering.[2][4] When he had saved $35,000, he moved to New York City and opened a small gambling den which later became known as a notorious "skinning dive" in the city's underworld. Within a few short years, Miller had organized a group con men who worked as banco-steerers and green goods men out of the Astor House and the Fifth Avenue Hotel. Miller became a familiar underworld figure and, according to popular lore, he kept his headquarters at "a lamp-post on the southwest corner of Broadway and Twenty-Eighth Street, against which he could generally be found leaning".[3][4]

Miller had originally arrived in New York and joined a "gambling clique" which had helped him in starting his gambling den. Once he had learned enough from them, he took another more knowledgeable partner and soon began competing with such leading swindlers as Joseph "Hungry Joe" Lewis and McDermott. Miller possessed a great deal of loyalty from his henchmen and, by directing his schemes though them, criminal prosecution against him was made extremely difficult. He also held a great deal of influence in the city legal system, due to his extensive police and political connections, which allowed considerable power to "pull the strings of the law when ever he so chose".[4]

He was especially well-known in the affluent communities of Long Branch, Nantasket Beach, Richfield Springs and other resorts frequented by New York high society. It was at these and similar areas that he directed his organization in swindling the wealthy residents. Miller spent at least half the year in high-class barrooms, restaurants and hotels, while he operated his organization during the summer. Although he is thought to have amassed at least several hundred thousand dollars in his lifetime, he spent much of his fortune living an extravagant lifestyle. He also incurred heavy gambling losses, especially on horse racing where he lost $20,000 in one day, and gave up playing faro when he lost $18,000 in one sitting at a Saratoga gambling resort.[4]

Death
In the spring of 1881, Miller became involved in a violent feud with saloon keeper and burglar Billy Tracy. The dispute between the two men became came to a head one night when Miller visited Tracy's saloon on West Twenty-Ninth Street. Tracy began to bully him once Miller entered the saloon but backed down when Miller indicted he would retaliate. Later when Tracy approached from behind, in which he was alleged to have shouted "I'll fix you!", Miller turned and fired his pistol at him. Miller fired three shots, one of which only slightly grazed Tracy, and the saloon keeper fell to the floor and began calling for the police. Miller's friends gathered around Tracy in a crowd and began laughing at him before eventually leaving. No arrests were made, however Tracy vowed to get revenge for his embarrassment.[4]

At around midnight on November 7, 1881, Miller was drinking at Dick Darling's Broadway saloon with several of his friends including Bill Bowie, George Law Jr., Harry Rice, Charles Crawford and Billy Temple. After an hour, Tracy was seen peaking into the saloon from the front entrance. A few minutes later, he reentered the saloon and walked up to the bar to order a whiskey sour. He then turned to Miller and said "I came in here to kill you" before drawing a revolver and pointing it at his head before shooting him in the stomach. Miller reached for his pistol but collapsed onto the floor. Miller was taken by ambulance to the New York Hospital where he died from his wounds shortly after his arrival. Tracy was arrested and tried for his murder, however he was found not guilty due to perjured testimony and returned to running his saloon.[4]

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Poster: TOOTMO Date: Oct 7, 2010 11:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: One for the Troll

"Charles P. Miller (c. 1851-November 7, 1881) was an American gambler, confidence man and swindler."

Ya think our Chas. is pushing AUD's masquerading as SBD's?

TOOTMO, I'm gone.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Oct 7, 2010 11:36am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: One for the Troll

And is nothing going to bring you back?

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Oct 7, 2010 11:31am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: One for the Troll

Yeah, and he was the sax player with War as well. Where does he find the time?

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 7, 2010 2:34pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: One for the Troll

Well?

Inquiring minds, or blank ones, want to know...post sketch, pic or facsimile?